Priya Deepika

Priya Deepika is an attorney turned sound-healer, educator and trainer. For over 20 years Priya’s career in social justice has developed along side her spiritual path as a Yogi and artist. Priya draws indigenous wisdom & practice from her South Indian lineage as well as her formal education and training. For the last 11 years Priya’s journey of the Voice has been central to her advocacy for social healing. She is trained and certified in Sound Voice and Music Healing from the California Institute for Integral Studies and as a Teacher trainer in Yoga of the Voice by the Vox Mundi Project led by Silvia Nakkach.

Priya’s background as a human-rights immigration lawyer and mediator has shaped her approach in helping others to find their true voice and safety for self-expression. Priya integrates sound as medicine and music into wellness education for emotional awareness, empathy, stress relief, trauma-release and revitalizing our capacity for greater human connection and creative inspiration.

Priya holds a BA in Public Policy and a Juris Doctorate. Priya is also a certified and trained Mediator, a certified facilitator of Sound Voice and Music Healing and teacher in Yoga of the Voice.

Priya’s music is known for its serene invitation qualities and melodic soundscapes exploring mood, tone and color of the human experience. Priya’s debut album “Hear In My Heart” will be available Spring of 2019.

Workshops & Presentations

  • Visionary Panel: De-Colonization and Anti-Oppression for Supportive Allyship

    120 min | Altar of Spirit

    We live in a moment when wounds imparted throughout a long history of violence are being re-opened across the country. It is time to ask how those who have traditionally benefitted from oppression can best inhabit the role of a supporter. What can allies do to assist and show solidarity to black, indigenous, and people of color communities? How can allies contribute to the national discussion without reproducing their historical function as a colonizer? What does colonization and anti-oppression even mean in a modern context? Further, what can the festival community, and Lucidity specifically, do to become accessible to diverse participation and to broaden the circle of inclusion?

Media